-1

Question:

Answer:

Nosebleed (epistaxis) usually indicates body weakness and it can be caused by an infection, cold weather or the drying effect of central heating (mainly they can be divided by local and systemic factors). If the mucous membrane becomes inflamed or cracked, it's more likely to bleed if it is disturbed.

You can usually stop a nosebleed by pinching your nose. If node bleeding happens quite often or lasts for too long, you should seek for medical help or contact otolaryngologist so the cause can be determined. Nosebleeds aren't usually serious, however frequent or excessive bleeding can be more serious for older people whose blood takes longer to clot ([haemophilia][4]) which can lead to iron deficiency (such as [anaemia][5]). To minimalize potential harm, [cauterising][6] is advised in this case.[NHS][7]

During cold winter seasons nose bleeding is associated with low [relative humidity][8] of inhaled air, so you could try some air room humidifiers and see if [increasing humidity][9] will make any difference.

To handle cold in general, while there's no cure for the common cold, there are the methods which can ease cold symptoms such as:

...

What was the reason?

I don't think the OP was asking how to deal with the common cold, but with epistaxis. anongoodnurse

In my understanding OP is asking about a common cold in summers ('How to handle cold in summers'), as well as in the description 'i have got a bit cold'. I understand he included some medical background, but I think question is about having cold. Therefore I've answered in this way. Anongoodnurse interpreted the question in different way, posting her answer day before and today removing mine (only because I've interpreted it differently, maybe as non-native speaker I did).

In my understanding epistaxis is a medical term for nosebleed which can be caused by different factors including a common cold (e.g. virus infection). Pure immune function is a risk for developing such disease (including nosebleed).

I've asked JohnP why he thinks my answer was removed, he replied:

I believe it was that and that you were addressing the common cold, rather than being cold as was pointed out in comments.

So it sounds like my answer was removed by only missing small claim which I missed to link? Is it the right reason for removal? Or because one mod interpreted the question in different way (by only thinking that the OP asked about something else than a cold, which is clearly in the title)? The removal is definitely not clear for me and this should be explained.

Including clarification what action should I take, so my answer would be undeleted.

  • If you are going to post my comments, please do so in their entirety. "I believe it was that and that you were addressing the common cold, rather than being cold as was pointed out in comments." – JohnP Apr 24 '15 at 15:28
  • @JohnP I did now. – kenorb Apr 24 '15 at 15:29
  • Your answer has been restored. Please note the actual question being asked, which would still not be answered by your original answer. I restored your answer to give you a chance to improve it and answer the true question. – JohnP Apr 24 '15 at 22:02
1

Comments from the original question asking for clarification and support:

Please support with references or remove: " Nosebleed (epistaxis) usually indicates body weakness..." Also, I don't think the OP was asking how to deal with the common cold, but with epistaxis. – anongoodnurse♦ 18 hours ago

@JohnP Did some minor improvements. Excessive bleeding which can cause anaemia is based on information found at NHS, they don't specify how much blood loss is actually needed to cause anemia. – kenorb 1 hour ago

You have not addressed the concern of @anongoodnurse. Considering you are labeling this a primary cause of epistaxis, can you add your references for this claim? – JohnP

In chat:

@JohnP Not sure if I understand. Epistaxis is just a medical term for nosebleed which can be caused by a common cold (e.g. virus infection). Pure immune function is a risk for developing such disease (including nosebleed). So what's wrong?

JohnP @kenorb Nosebleed (epistaxis) usually indicates body weakness. No support for that claim.

kenorb Do you think this was the main reason for deletion (missing small claim)?

JohnP I believe it was that and that you were addressing the common cold, rather than being cold as was pointed out in comments.

I state that I believe your message was deleted (not by me) because of both of those reasons. A claim with no support, and addressing the common cold rather than being cold. I see that you have asked for clarification, if the poster is indeed asking about the common cold your answer can possibly be reinstated.

  • I was planning to comment on epistaxis and other suggestions just seconds before my answer was removed after I've done other changes to my answer which were addressing other issues. And I had in plans to link the support that nosebleed can indicate body weakness. But now there is no point of finding the right link, if my whole answer is removed for unclear reasons. – kenorb Apr 24 '15 at 16:00
  • @kenorb - you saw the comment, which was left long enough for you to see it, but you didn't remove or support your claim. That is only one part of the reason it was deleted. You also had the wrong reason why nosebleeds are a problem in the elderly. You make a lot of presumptions which are unsupported. That is why your answer was deleted. – anongoodnurse Apr 24 '15 at 16:15
  • @anongoodnurse Which comment, the one you 'thought' the OP is not talking about a common cold? I've commented on question and still waiting from OP clarification, therefore I can't proceed with the answer changes until I don't know for sure. And this clearly shouldn't be the reason for removal. – kenorb Apr 24 '15 at 16:19
  • @kenorb - that's a good point. Ideally, unclear questions should be clarified before answering with a "shotgun" approach (one that tries to cover all possibilities), or risk answering something the OP didn't intend. If the OP doesn't come back to clarify, they are not interested in the answer. – anongoodnurse Apr 24 '15 at 16:22
  • @anongoodnurse Yes, it's a great idea. But in this case why you posted your answer if the question wasn't clear, and removed mine? – kenorb Apr 24 '15 at 17:23
  • This was not a sole decision. This was discussed among the moderators, and part of the reason was that it offered no interpretation, and was mostly link references, that did not appear to answer the question. As I have stated, if the OP clarifies, the answer can be restored for improvement. I would have done the same. – JohnP Apr 24 '15 at 17:46
  • OP clarified now it's about 'cold and nose bleed both together', therefore removal was not fair. I've flagged for undeletion then. – kenorb Apr 24 '15 at 21:15
  • @kenorb - As you can see, I have asked for distinction. Saying "i have cold and nosebleed both together" is still ambiguous. Realize that the poster is probably not a native English speaker, and may not realize the distinction in English between the two or how to express it. – JohnP Apr 24 '15 at 21:19
  • I'm sure by saying he has 'cold' he meant 'a common cold'. How this is still ambiguous? I don't get it. – kenorb Apr 24 '15 at 21:22
  • Relax. He will clarify. His original question said "I have got a bit cold and nosebleed" and his clarification said "I have cold and nosebleed". I asked a more specific question. If it turns out he is talking about a common cold, then yes, I will undelete your question so that you can improve it. – JohnP Apr 24 '15 at 21:25

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .